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Develop Azure Platform as a Service compute solutions

17. AZ-203/204 - Understanding the Azure Function - Part 1

Hi, and welcome back. So in the early chapters, we saw how to create an Azure function app and how to create an Azure function. So before we proceed, let me give you an overview of the benefits of using Azure functions. So obviously the first benefit is that it is a service for which you don't need to manage the underlying infrastructure. Assume you've already submitted your application. So this could be an application, or it could be a system of many applications. Let's say this is an ecommerce application that allows customers to purchase products online. So you could have a module for adding a product, a module for processing orders, a module for displaying the orders, another module for displaying the products, and another submodule for, let's say, emailing the order details.

As a result, as your application grows, so will the number of modules that comprise it, based on your needs. So your application starts becoming bigger; it starts taking up more CPU resources, let's say, if you're rehosting this application on a virtual machine. So in some cases, what you can do is, instead of having these as modules in your application code, let's say the email order module, you can actually make it available as an Azure function. Your application can then go ahead and invoke the Azure function instead of directly going ahead and invoking the module within the application itself. This helps to keep at least the lines of your application intact. So instead of growing your application code in one code base itself, you could have code that is available as part of Azure functions. So that's one good use-case scenario.

Another advantage of Azure functions is that, remember, you can have different underlying programming languages. So maybe your application could be in DotNet or InNet Core, but your Azure function could be in Java. You could have an Azure function in PowerShell as well. As a result, your Azurefunction does not need to be in.NET Core. You can have your application in one programming language and your Azure functions in another programming language. The other benefit of Azure functions is that there are triggers and bindings from other Azure services available. So let's say a message is added to an Azure queue. That message can then invoke an Azure function, and that function can go and process the message accordingly. So there are multiple benefits of using Azure functions; I just want to give you a couple of them, right? So this marks the end of this chapter.

18. AZ-203/204 - Understanding the Azure Function - Part 2

Hi. Welcome back. Now in this chapter, we'll basically have an understanding of the functions that we have over here. Now over here in our function, we have something known as a C Sharp. So you could also have your normal C code that's part of a C script that runs as part of your Azure function. Now we'll dwell on the code, but before that, I actually want to go ahead and basically run this particular function just to show exactly what it does. And then after that, we'll actually dig more into the boilerplate code that's available for this Azure function.

So over here, we have something known as logs. So in the logs, you can see the compilation of this C script. So when you click on the Save button, if you make any changes to your script, when you click on the Save button, it will basically do a compilation of your code. If there are any errors in the compilation, you'll actually see them in the logs. Also, whatever the output of your script is, if there are any errors, or if there are any logging statements in your script, will be available when it runs. You can also see it in the logs over here. Now, if I go to the right hand side, there's something known as "view files." So when you actually go ahead and create your function, there are two files that get created. The first is your run CX file. So that is basically your C# script file, and the other file is known as a function JSON file.

So this is like a configuration file that's available for your Azure function. So this configuration file basically contains aspects such as the bindings for your function, the triggers for your function, and other configuration that is required for your function itself. You can also see that you have the ability to add or upload other code artefacts as well. So, if I go on to the JSON function files, I can now minimise the locks. So in the function JSON file here, you can see you have the bindings. So we'll go through this a little bit later on. I just want to show you all of the aspects that are available for the Azure function. So if I go back on to our C-sharp script file So over here, let's say I just make a small change. If I go on to the logs, let me go and hit on Save.So over here, you can see that there are some warning error messages, but at the same time, your compilation has succeeded. So when you make changes, like I said, if you click on the Save button, you basically have a compilation that takes place. Now you can also go ahead and run this code from within the portal itself. So you have a test section over here. Now you can choose what method you want to use to invoke your function; remember that this function is based on an HTTP trigger. So you can trigger this function via an HTTP method.

So, let's start with the Get method. And in the Get method, we can actually add a query parameter. So I can add a name query of name. Let me give you a value for John. So now our function can be invoked using the Get method. I can scroll down and click on the "Run" button. So over here, you can see that we have a status of 200, OK, and here is the output. So it's taking our querying parameter, staking the value, and giving an output. So I said later on, I'll go ahead and explain the code. I want to run the code to let you know what exactly is happening over here. Now we can also go ahead and execute the Post method. So for this, we don't need a corresponding parameter. Here is our request body, which can actually pass in a Post method. Let me again go ahead and click on "Run." And over here, you're seeing that you're getting the statuses of two and okay, and the output of Hello Azure. So you've seen how we could actually invoke this function from within the portal itself. But let's say you want to invoke this function from outside. So here we have the Postman tool. So let's say we want to invoke this function from the Postman tool. So how do we get the URL for this particular function? So over here, there's something known as a get function URL.

So let me go ahead and copy that. So here you have the keys, the different keys that are available. You have the function key that's for the function itself, or you have the host key, which is available for all of the functions. So for now, let me go ahead and copy the function URL using the default function key. Let me go on to the postman to create a new request. As you can see, you have the function key here. This helps authorise Postman to go ahead and execute that as your function. So from a security perspective, it's good to have a key that can be used to invoke your function. Over here, you can see the function name. Now, remember that our function accepts a query parameter. So over here, we can go ahead and add a querying parameter. You may proceed by clicking the Send button. So it's sending the request. And here you are saying you're getting the output as desired. So now we are invoking our function from the Postman tool. We can also do this using the post method.

So I can click on "post." Over here, I can go ahead and remove the querying parameter. So after removing the query parameter, if I now go onto the body, remember that when you're making a post request, you can add content to the body of the request. I'm going to choose raw. Over here, I'm going to choose JSON, and let me enter JSON data. So I'll enter the name Mark. Let me go ahead and click on "Send." And if you scroll down, you'll see that you're getting the output as desired. So over here, we have seen how we can actually go ahead, compile our code, and also execute our code from an external tool, right? So with this in mind, let's go on to the next chapter to basically understand the code itself.

19. AZ-203/204 - The use of Azure Functions

Hi, and welcome back. So in the prior chapter, we had seen how we could compile our Azure function and how we could run our Azure function. Now let's go ahead and understand the boilerplate code that is given to us when we go ahead and create your function based on the SP trigger. So the first statement is used to go ahead and reference an external assembly. So if you want to work with JSON-based objects, you have this particular assembly or the popular assembly of mutantsoft JSON.

Now, there are certain assemblies that are only available in Azure functions. So, for example, you have the system net, the Microsoft ASP netcodeMVC, and the Microsoft extension Primitives. However, if you want to refer to an external assembly, you have the hash AREA statement and the name of the assembly. You then have your normal using statements to go ahead and use those namespaces within your script. Now, since we have an SB trigger for our Azure function, the run method is invoked first. Now, because we are sending a request, either you could do it from the browser if it's a Get request or we're using our Postman tool to send a request, and all the details of that request are available as an SB request object. So when we send a request, remember we have the method, which could be a get or a post. You can have header information and body information as well. So all of that is now available to the C script via this request object. Now you can also log information on the logs. So we've seen that in our Azure function in the Azure Portal.

So this is good when you want to debug your Azure functions. The next statement is now used to go ahead and get the question parameter. So over here we are fetching the value of the question parameter, which has a key of "name." The next set of statements is used to read the request body. So if you are making a post request, remember that you can actually add, so it was just a mistake. This is a JSON object. So you can actually add the JSON data as part of the body of the request. This statement will go through all of the data. It will then go out and use the desirable object method so that we get a JSON object, and then we can go ahead and reference the name key that's available as part of a JSON object. And then, finally, we can go ahead and return an HTP result. So the result is "hello plus whatever we get in the name." So the boilerplate template is the foundation of our Azurefunction, correct? So I just want to have a quick run-through of the boilerplate template code that is given to us when we create an HP trigger as your function.

20. AZ-203/204 - Lab - Azure Functions - Using normal classes

Hi. Welcome back. Now, in this chapter, I want to show you that you can use your normal classes in your C# script. So over here, if I scroll down, you can see I've gone ahead and defined a class over here that's stored as "course." So over here, I have three properties: the ID, the name, and the string.

So as usual, I am going ahead and reading the request body. So over here, I'm assuming I'm making a post request to the Azure Function. In the post request body, I'm ensuring that I add values for the ID, the name, and the rating. I'm going ahead and using the DSLR object method, ensuring that I use type conversion over here for the courses so that I get an object of the type course. And then I'm going ahead and logging that information.

So, first and foremost, let me click the Save button. So this will ensure that our function is compiled. I entered the Function URL into the Postman tool once more. Here. I have the function URL. Now, if I go on to the request body, I've gone ahead and added values for the ID, the name, and the rating. Let me go ahead and click on "Send." Once this is over, if I go back onto the lock screen here, you can see we have the information for the idea of the course, the course name, and the course rating. So in this chapter, I just want to show you that you can use your normal classes as you normally do in your C Sharp scripts. Right, so this marks the end of this chapter.

21. AZ-203/204 - Lab - Azure Functions - Timer trigger

Hi, and welcome back. Now, in this chapter, let's go through a quick implementation of the timer trigger. So let me go ahead and add a new function. So over here, I'll go ahead and choose the timer trigger so I can give it a name. Now over here, we have an acronym expression for the schedule. So currently, it's scheduled to run every five minutes. Let me go ahead and run it every 1 minute and hit create. And over here, we just have some boilerplate code within the run method; it's just logging information. It's just adding what the time was when the function ran. So if I go ahead and open the logs, let me just go ahead and wait for a minute. So now you can see our function execute automatically. So after every bit, this function would run. So if you have any tasks that need to be executed at a particular time interval, you can go ahead and make use of the timer trigger, right? So this is just a quick implementation of the timer trigger for Azure functions.

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