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350-501: Implementing and Operating Cisco Service Provider Network Core Technologies (SPCOR) Certification Video Training Course

The complete solution to prepare for for your exam with 350-501: Implementing and Operating Cisco Service Provider Network Core Technologies (SPCOR) certification video training course. The 350-501: Implementing and Operating Cisco Service Provider Network Core Technologies (SPCOR) certification video training course contains a complete set of videos that will provide you with thorough knowledge to understand the key concepts. Top notch prep including Cisco SPCOR 350-501 exam dumps, study guide & practice test questions and answers.

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253 Lectures
14:30:00 Hours

350-501: Implementing and Operating Cisco Service Provider Network Core Technologies (SPCOR) Certification Video Training Course Exam Curriculum

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About Cisco Certifications

6 Lectures
Time 00:24:00
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SPCOR-350-501

4 Lectures
Time 00:29:00
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STATIC - DEFAULT ROUTING

10 Lectures
Time 01:49:00
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OSPF Basics

10 Lectures
Time 01:02:00
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OSPF Configuration - Single Area

6 Lectures
Time 00:40:00
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OSPF Metric -Cost

6 Lectures
Time 00:29:00
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OSPF Areas

6 Lectures
Time 00:56:00
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OSPF Advance

5 Lectures
Time 00:48:00
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IPv6

7 Lectures
Time 01:26:00
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ISIS Routing - Basics

5 Lectures
Time 00:59:00
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ISIS Routing - Advance

5 Lectures
Time 01:00:00
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Border Gateway Protocol

3 Lectures
Time 00:42:00
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BGP Neighbors

5 Lectures
Time 01:14:00
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External BGP

2 Lectures
Time 00:26:00
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BGP Attributes

3 Lectures
Time 00:41:00
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Weight & Local Preference

8 Lectures
Time 01:51:00
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Virtual Private Networks

5 Lectures
Time 00:51:00
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MPLS Label Distribution Protocol

8 Lectures
Time 01:40:00
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MPLS Layer 3 VPN

7 Lectures
Time 01:38:00
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MPLS L3 VPN - RIP-EIGRP-OSPF

6 Lectures
Time 01:20:00
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MPLS L3 VPN - Advance

7 Lectures
Time 01:08:00
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MPLS L3 VPN - Troubleshooting

2 Lectures
Time 00:29:00
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IP Multicasting

3 Lectures
Time 00:24:00
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IGMP - PIM Protocols

5 Lectures
Time 00:56:00
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PIM Sparse Mode - RP

8 Lectures
Time 01:36:00
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Quality of Service (QoS)

4 Lectures
Time 00:41:00
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Classification & Marking

3 Lectures
Time 00:22:00
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28

Congestion Management - Queuing

5 Lectures
Time 00:49:00
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Congestion Avoidance - Traffic Policing-Shaping

4 Lectures
Time 00:39:00
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Network Infrastructure Protection

5 Lectures
Time 00:25:00
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Remote Management- TELNET - SSH

3 Lectures
Time 00:22:00
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Authentication, Authorization, Accounting - AAA

4 Lectures
Time 00:27:00
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AAA Authentication

4 Lectures
Time 00:28:00
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Control Plane Security

5 Lectures
Time 00:45:00
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IOS-XR - ASR

6 Lectures
Time 00:37:00
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IOS-XR Configuration - Routing

10 Lectures
Time 00:48:00
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Network Management

4 Lectures
Time 00:47:00
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Network Automation

6 Lectures
Time 01:02:00
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39

Software Defined Networking -SDN

4 Lectures
Time 00:45:00
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SDN-Control-MGMT-DATA Plane

6 Lectures
Time 00:27:00
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SDN Models - Architecture

6 Lectures
Time 00:41:00
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Application Programming Interface - API

5 Lectures
Time 00:41:00
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Web Service API - REST API

3 Lectures
Time 00:24:00
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44

Network Automation Tools

7 Lectures
Time 00:49:00
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45

PUPPET - Config MGMT Tool

6 Lectures
Time 00:24:00
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46

CHEF- Config MGMT Tool

2 Lectures
Time 00:13:00
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ANSIBLE- COnfig MGMT Tool

4 Lectures
Time 00:23:00
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JSON Data Encoding

5 Lectures
Time 00:33:00

About Cisco Certifications

  • 11:00
  • 1:00
  • 1:00
  • 2:00
  • 6:00
  • 3:00

SPCOR-350-501

  • 3:00
  • 2:00
  • 10:00
  • 14:00

STATIC - DEFAULT ROUTING

  • 7:00
  • 6:00
  • 14:00
  • 16:00
  • 14:00
  • 11:00
  • 9:00
  • 7:00
  • 8:00
  • 17:00

OSPF Basics

  • 2:00
  • 6:00
  • 3:00
  • 11:00
  • 13:00
  • 5:00
  • 6:00
  • 5:00
  • 8:00
  • 3:00

OSPF Configuration - Single Area

  • 8:00
  • 9:00
  • 3:00
  • 7:00
  • 9:00
  • 4:00

OSPF Metric -Cost

  • 6:00
  • 6:00
  • 6:00
  • 1:00
  • 4:00
  • 6:00

OSPF Areas

  • 7:00
  • 7:00
  • 15:00
  • 5:00
  • 12:00
  • 10:00

OSPF Advance

  • 7:00
  • 10:00
  • 9:00
  • 13:00
  • 9:00

IPv6

  • 9:00
  • 7:00
  • 17:00
  • 11:00
  • 13:00
  • 14:00
  • 15:00

ISIS Routing - Basics

  • 12:00
  • 10:00
  • 14:00
  • 11:00
  • 12:00

ISIS Routing - Advance

  • 15:00
  • 16:00
  • 13:00
  • 8:00
  • 8:00

Border Gateway Protocol

  • 14:00
  • 10:00
  • 18:00

BGP Neighbors

  • 11:00
  • 17:00
  • 11:00
  • 18:00
  • 17:00

External BGP

  • 8:00
  • 18:00

BGP Attributes

  • 10:00
  • 18:00
  • 13:00

Weight & Local Preference

  • 14:00
  • 7:00
  • 17:00
  • 7:00
  • 18:00
  • 15:00
  • 16:00
  • 17:00

Virtual Private Networks

  • 11:00
  • 14:00
  • 7:00
  • 11:00
  • 8:00

MPLS Label Distribution Protocol

  • 16:00
  • 9:00
  • 5:00
  • 9:00
  • 14:00
  • 19:00
  • 14:00
  • 14:00

MPLS Layer 3 VPN

  • 8:00
  • 10:00
  • 23:00
  • 20:00
  • 8:00
  • 19:00
  • 10:00

MPLS L3 VPN - RIP-EIGRP-OSPF

  • 14:00
  • 14:00
  • 15:00
  • 9:00
  • 14:00
  • 14:00

MPLS L3 VPN - Advance

  • 9:00
  • 12:00
  • 18:00
  • 12:00
  • 5:00
  • 9:00
  • 3:00

MPLS L3 VPN - Troubleshooting

  • 12:00
  • 17:00

IP Multicasting

  • 11:00
  • 6:00
  • 7:00

IGMP - PIM Protocols

  • 14:00
  • 7:00
  • 7:00
  • 16:00
  • 12:00

PIM Sparse Mode - RP

  • 14:00
  • 13:00
  • 5:00
  • 7:00
  • 15:00
  • 17:00
  • 16:00
  • 9:00

Quality of Service (QoS)

  • 11:00
  • 7:00
  • 8:00
  • 15:00

Classification & Marking

  • 5:00
  • 11:00
  • 6:00

Congestion Management - Queuing

  • 10:00
  • 6:00
  • 9:00
  • 16:00
  • 8:00

Congestion Avoidance - Traffic Policing-Shaping

  • 10:00
  • 8:00
  • 13:00
  • 8:00

Network Infrastructure Protection

  • 5:00
  • 8:00
  • 6:00
  • 3:00
  • 3:00

Remote Management- TELNET - SSH

  • 7:00
  • 6:00
  • 9:00

Authentication, Authorization, Accounting - AAA

  • 11:00
  • 4:00
  • 8:00
  • 4:00

AAA Authentication

  • 3:00
  • 10:00
  • 3:00
  • 12:00

Control Plane Security

  • 9:00
  • 12:00
  • 7:00
  • 5:00
  • 12:00

IOS-XR - ASR

  • 6:00
  • 5:00
  • 6:00
  • 8:00
  • 7:00
  • 5:00

IOS-XR Configuration - Routing

  • 7:00
  • 7:00
  • 7:00
  • 3:00
  • 4:00
  • 5:00
  • 3:00
  • 6:00
  • 3:00
  • 3:00

Network Management

  • 8:00
  • 14:00
  • 7:00
  • 18:00

Network Automation

  • 11:00
  • 16:00
  • 6:00
  • 12:00
  • 9:00
  • 8:00

Software Defined Networking -SDN

  • 8:00
  • 15:00
  • 9:00
  • 13:00

SDN-Control-MGMT-DATA Plane

  • 2:00
  • 6:00
  • 3:00
  • 3:00
  • 7:00
  • 6:00

SDN Models - Architecture

  • 5:00
  • 7:00
  • 9:00
  • 7:00
  • 7:00
  • 6:00

Application Programming Interface - API

  • 11:00
  • 4:00
  • 9:00
  • 9:00
  • 8:00

Web Service API - REST API

  • 8:00
  • 8:00
  • 8:00

Network Automation Tools

  • 6:00
  • 9:00
  • 6:00
  • 6:00
  • 7:00
  • 10:00
  • 5:00

PUPPET - Config MGMT Tool

  • 3:00
  • 3:00
  • 5:00
  • 6:00
  • 4:00
  • 3:00

CHEF- Config MGMT Tool

  • 6:00
  • 7:00

ANSIBLE- COnfig MGMT Tool

  • 8:00
  • 3:00
  • 5:00
  • 7:00

JSON Data Encoding

  • 8:00
  • 8:00
  • 7:00
  • 3:00
  • 7:00
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About 350-501: Implementing and Operating Cisco Service Provider Network Core Technologies (SPCOR) Certification Video Training Course

350-501: Implementing and Operating Cisco Service Provider Network Core Technologies (SPCOR) certification video training course by prepaway along with practice test questions and answers, study guide and exam dumps provides the ultimate training package to help you pass.

IPv6

5. IPv6 Static - Default Routing

IPV Six routing As you may recall from previous sections, we have already covered the majority of the topics, such as basic IPV6 address configurations. And now we need to ensure that router one is connecting to router two. Now these two routers must be able to communicate with each other. Now, to do that, we can implement some routing configurations. Now, the concept of routing is similar to what we did in IP version 4 and IP version 6.

We also have static routing, which is the same as manual configuration, and the syntax is similar to what we used in IP version four. And then we have something called rap. Rap version 2 is now available in IP version 4. Rapng, the next generation of Rip, is what we call it here. Everything remains the same when it comes to, what do you call them, metrics or features. The maximum hop counts are again 15, and the metric is calculated based on the hop counts. Everything is the same. The only difference is that we configure things in a similar manner here.

IP 6 is also supported by ISS. We'll move on to ISS, a different protocol that also supports IPV6, and then OSP for V3. OSP for V2 is the protocol that we use for IPversion 4. It is now referred to as the OSP of V 3. And then the BGP that we use for IP version 4, which was initially deployed, now supports something called MPGP. When you say MP BGP, it means that it not only supports IPV 4, but also IPV 6, as well as VPN V 4 and VPN V 6, which are more closely related to MPLS concepts. That's what we call MPGP multi-protocol. Then there's EHRP for IP version six, which almost all Cisco iOS devices support. In this section, we will begin with static routing.

Now one more thing we need to keep in mind whenever we want to use IPV6 routing: it has to be enabled before you use any of the routing processes. Now we need to give a command called IPV6 unicast routing. Because the IP routing command is enabled by default in all Cisco IOS devices, this command is more similar to the one used in IP version 4. So that's the reason we don't really need to give this command unless you give something like no IP routing, which is something we don't do. So if you disable it, then you only need to manually enable it, but by default it is enabled. But in most of the squareways, the IPBC routing is disabled. So you'll get a message saying that IPBCrouting is not enabled whenever you try to configure any of the routing configurations. So, before using any of the routing configurations, make sure that IPV6 unicast routing is enabled. After that, let's move on to static routing.

Now, the concept of static routing is exactly the same as what we learned in IP version 4. So I'm not going to get into detail about those things. So, different from how to configure static routing or what static routing is and what its features are, I expect you to understand how the syntax of writing the static route and the default route is more similar in IP version six when compared to IP version four. If you see router one here, I want to make sure that router one tries a route for the router to Latinoface.

What will be the command we use? We need to give a command called "IP Route." We'll say IPV six route destination now. Network ID What is the destination network ID? Here it is: FC 0022 and then the colon column. So when I say "colon column," which means it can be anything after that, So normally, you know that the network portion, which represents the host portion, will always be zero whenever we write the network ID.

So we need to write the network ID, and then we need to write the subnet mask. So the submit mask is 64, and the next hop IP address follows. So what is the next-stop IP address here? This 2001 one two colon one two colon one two colon one two colon two something here is the next stop IP address. So we are writing the next top IP address here. If you see that the syntax is the same, it's almost similar. Instead of IP, we write IPV six. Destination ID is still the same. Instead of two five five, we write slash value and then the next stop address. We need to write the next stop address. Or we can also write our own exit interface.

Let's say I have a one-by-zero interface. I can write my own exit interface. Now, the syntax for starting out is exactly the same. Now, how do we write the statement if we want to configure default routing? If we want to configure default routing, we must provide an IPV6 six-route destination network ID. So in the case of normal IPV4, we say IProute zero zero zero, which means whatever the destination is, and then zero zero zero, whatever the subnetmask, and we write the next top IP address.

Let's say one, one, two. In the case of IPV6, we write the same IPV6 out zero colon, which represents this one all zeros, followed by a slash zero, which represents the submit mask, and then the next IP address, 2001, one two, or something along those lines. Now, this is the way we configure default routing and the concept of default routing. Again, it's the same thing. If you want to route any traffic to any unknown destinations, we use default routing. Exactly like the internet. So concept-wise, static and default routing are exactly the same, no changes. But the way we configure it is something like this:

So let's try to verify the same thing practically here. Now, for practical verification, I have two routers, the same two routers that we configured. And these two routers are already configured with IVC services. If you recall from previous basic sessions, we talked about how to assign the IPV six services to an interface. So, as shown in the diagram, if you verify Show IPV Six interfacebrief, this interface is already assigned with this address. In addition, I have another address that we use in stateless auto configuration. It doesn't make a difference anyway, so let it be; let it be like that only. So we are not going to use or disturb that address. Now this is just to show you that, okay, a single interface can also have multiple IPP services.

Now that the Van interface is zero by zero, it is configured with the same IPV6 as everything else on the screen in the diagram, and the same way on router two. Also, the LAN interface is FC zero 00:22.It's configured as a diagram here. And the Van interface is also configured exactly the same way. Now what's the next thing? Now we need to go to config mode. We need to configure a static route. And then I'm going to say IPV 6-route destination network ID FC 0022, which means the host portion can be all zeros. And then the subnet mask And, sorry, I'm going to write the next-to-top items 2001 and 2. And here I have to use the okay, no-error message, which means the command is correct. Also, show IPV.6 allowed if you verify. So normally we use "show IP out." We must state that showing IPV-6 is permitted.

Now you must see something called C. C represents a connected interface, mostly the connected network, and L represents the local IP or local addresses, whatever you have configured on this specific database. And then you'll see something called "S.S." that is going to represent a static route. And we just configured a static route for Scotlandtwo, two, and whatever it is, whenever any packet is unique for this network, it will be automatically routed to the next top of 2001-121-2121 two and then two. Okay, similarly, we must construct the opposite side of the IPB Six route. I'm going to say FC 0011, which is a network ID. The mask is then submitted, and the next stop is completed in 2001.

So if everything is okay, then I should be able to see the route. In the routing table, you can see the Show IPV-6 route. I can see the static route. Now, finally, from the router 2, you must be able to pin to the router 1's LAN interface. Anyway, I don't have any PCs to verify here, but if you are able to ping the router's one LAN interface, that is going to confirm that the routing is correct. It's not taking. The reason is that I did not enable the IPV6 unicast routing. So that's the problem here, actually. So I need to go to Router One as well. I need to enable IPV6 unique routing.

Let me try one more time after enabling this command. So there is some problem here; let me check. display IPV Six route I get the reason why we are not able to communicate. If I try to ping from the router's LAN interface, I'm not able to ping. You can see that unreachable messages are coming because I did not connect the line interface in my GNSHree, and if you go to my interface interface zero by zero, I removed that keep a command here for a reason. So the interface is down; that's the reason it is showing.

So either you provide a connection or simply give no permission to keep the interface up so that it should start working. Show the IPV Six interface brief now that it's available. So there was an interface issue. So now I should be able to pin it here in a similar way. You can try from the router's one-line interface if you want; you should be able to ping now from the router's two-line interface. similar way I'll quickly reconfigure. Remove the static routing, just add "no" before that, and the same thing I'm going to do on the router too as well. I will remove the static routing that I have created and use the default routing. So I didn't remove it. Yeah, now it has been removed. So to configure default load, we need to say, "IPVSix out." Don't use default load on both sites. But still, on one side, you can say "zero colon," "colon," whatever be the destination, and "slash zero," whatever be the submit mask.

And I'm going to say one, two, colon, two, colon, and the next top. So, if I check the routing table and enter ShowIPV Six, I can see that there is a static route learned or configured, and you can see something like this. So this represents a default route in IP version six. The router experienced the same issue. We are going to say IPV six route zero, and the next stopper is 2001 two. So the next stop is correct. So if I send Show IPV Six out, we can see that now, and I should still be able to communicate because anything that comes on the Router Two interface will automatically send to the Router One interface, and the Router One will send to its plan interface. Now, the configuration of default routing is exactly the same as the way we configure static loading. As a result, this is how we configure. But when it comes to concepts, technology, or the way they work, it's exactly the same. What we have learned in IP version four.

6. OSPFv3 - IPv6 OSPF

This section will discuss the OSP of the V-3 protocol. If you recall, we have some OSPF protocol in the case of IP version 4. OSPF Version Two is what we call it. OSPF is a protocol that is designed for IP version 4 implementation. When it comes to IP version 6, we have something called OSPF V-2 version 3. Now, the concept of OSP version three is exactly the same as OSP version two.

For example, if you consider the concept of areas dividing the areas, area zero should be at the backbone; or if you consider any other design considerations; or if you consider any advanced OSP contributions such as virtuallink summarizations or the Osprey concept. So technology-wise, both protocols are exactly similar.

Now, based on the OSP of V2, we have some enhancements where it will distribute IPV6 prefixes and run entirely over IP Version 6. Apart from that, you have some extra specific attributes added to this: it's a 128-bit address, and it supports linking local addresses. Furthermore, we can have multiple addresses on the same interface, which is not possible with IP version four. And we can also have multiple instances of OSPO running on the same interface.

Then there's authentication. OSPO V-3, like V-2, supports authentication. But in this case, we have Ipsick communication. Remember that in the case of OSP version 2, it supports both clear text and MD5 file authentication. We have an inbuilt authentication method called Ipsy here, and OSPF runs over a link rather than on a specific subnet.

Now, that means we are going to run OSPF directly under the interface, not on the subnet. which means we don't use network commands here. Instead, we enable the protocol under the interface, just like we did in the previous section of our IP. Let us try to get into the configurations: what configurations are required to configure OSPO V 3? So I'm going to take some routers and do very basic configuration. Here you can see my router here. I got two routers, the same two routers that I used in my previous labs, and I just designed them in different areas.

Now, the concept of areas is exactly the same. Area zero should be at the center, and any non-backbone area connecting must connect to area zero in order to exchange routes between them. Here is also what I did. I configured the router one Van interface in area 10, the router one Van interface in area 0, and the router two in the same manner. All two interfaces belong to area 10. Now, if I'm doing the same thing in IP version 4, we generally go to the router OSP of 1. This is the command that we use to enable the protocol.

Then, in general, we configure some at outriding. So the route-riding concept is exactly the same in IP version six. So we'll see that, and then if you want to advertise any network, we generally say "network," whatever the network, and then whatever the wildcard mask we need to give. Then we must give area and area ID nothing more than a number.

Nothing but IP version 4, OSP of protocol is done in OSP of V2. In the case of IP version 6, OSPO, that is, V 3 OSP, is used. We got similar-sounding commands, but there's a difference here. Now we must learn the new commands for configuring OSPO V 3 in IP version 6. So the first command is to enter configuration mode, as we did in Router OSPF 1. We must also use IPV6, Router OSPF1, and this command is more similar to this command.

So we'll just use Router OSPF One here. In the case of IP version 6, we need to do IPV 6, Router OSPF 1, and then once you do this, you go to the router mode. Within the router mode, we also enter router mode. Again, here also, we have a concept of "routing," and that "route ready" has to be given in the IP version 4 format only.

Now this is something we need to remember here because normally, if you think about the routing-out concept in IPOs and spo in IP version 4, by default, routes can be given manually. That is the first thing that happens if you use the routeready command; if you do not configure the routers manually, then it is going to take the highest IP address, which is the IPV4 address of the loopback interface. If you have multiple loopback interfaces, it's going to use the highest loopback as a router. And if you do not have a manual router ID and there is no loopback interface, it's going to take the highest IPB for the automatic physical interface.

Now, in the case of IP version six, that is, in V3 OSP, the concept of a router also states that it still uses the IP version 4 address, which means that even though we are using IP version six OSP, the route ready only identifies a name. So it doesn't make a difference whether you're using IPV 6 or IPV 4.

But still, if you use the question mark after this, you'll see that the route Rd must be in IP version 4 format only, and the concept of route riding is exactly the same as what we have learned in IP version 4. So this is something we need to remember. When you return, the exit command will return you to the configuration mode. Now to advertise the interfaces. In our scenario, I'd like to configure OSP on router one's line interface f zero by zero.

So I must proceed to the f-0 interface. So I'll be in interface mode. Now inside the interface mode, this configuration mode, we need to give a command called IPV SixOSP of 1, because I'm using a prosthetic one here. And then we need to define this specific interface as arrogant. in which area? As per the diagram, it has to be area ten. That's it.

So now this command is more equivalent to your network command. If you remember the previous slide, I mentioned that OSPO V 3 operates over Alink rather than a subnet. So here we are not advertising on the subnet, but instead we are going to run that specific protocol under the interface, under the link, so that whenever you convey this command automatically, whatever the Ipvc services configured under this interface are will be advertised automatically in area ten.

Similarly, what is the other interface we are using? one by one interfaces The second interface one by one interfaces We need to say IPV 6, OSPO 1, and then area—what is the area we are supposed to vitalize as per the diagram? It has to be area 0. So we need to change the area number. If you see the configuration of IP version six OSPF, that is OSPF version three. It is something new because the outer concept is still the same.

The way we advertise is totally different. But when it comes to technology, like the areas or any of the specifications, like the LinkedIn protocol, it has the same features that we have learned in IP version 4 OSPR. Let's try to quickly implement this lab and verify it on Router One and Router Two. So I got my routers preconfigured for with Ipvc service.

If you just check back, I can see here that router Fzero by zero is compared with FC 0011, exactly the same. And IPV6 services are pre-conferred with S one by zero. And if I show IPV6 six protocols just to verify whether I'm running any other routing protocol or not, I'm not running any of the routing protocols. So, if you want to continue with our previous topic, IP versionsix ripeng, you should probably remove that rip protocol before moving on to OSPF. So here I just started my topology, so there's no routing protocol running on router one.

Let me just confirm the routers as well. The IPV-6 protocols are visible. I don't have any of the routing protocols running here on the router one.I'd like to perform Show IPV-6 unicastrouting because I didn't enable routing. So I'm just booting up my device for the first time after assigning IPV services, IPV 6, Route OSPF 1. Now, once you give this command, you can see the message here; it says OSPFprocessor One could not pick the route ready. Please configure the router manually. What this means is that whenever you configure OSPV 3, it will try to use manual routers by default. In our scenario, we did not configure any manual routers until now, and then it will try to take the highest IP 4 hour of the loopback, which means that there is no IP V4 configured in my network if I go show IP interface breath.

I don't have any IPV4 addresses running in my network here, so I just assumed nothing was there; as you can see, there isn't a single IP address. There is no loop back. There's no physical interface as well. If we try to take the highest IP of the loopback, it will try to take the highest IP for the physical database address if there is no loopback. Now in my scenario, these three things are not possible because I don't have a single IPV4 address running on my router. Now, in those cases where it is able to pick the router but fails to pick the outerity, it will prompt you to manually configure it. That's what this message is about.

So OSPV-3 could not pick the router ID because there is no IP-4 running in your network. So in this kind of scenario, whenever you see that message, it becomes mandatory for you to define the router because, without the router, OSPF will not work. And then advertise the interfaces.

What are the interfaces? As per my diagram, I need to go to router one, interface zero by zero, IPV 6, OSPF 1, and then area ten. Similarly, interfaces one by zero IPV6; OSPF one; and area zero have been completed. So if you want to verify, show IPV6 protocols. very useful command. As you can see, I obtained an S one by zero interface in area zero and an S zero by zero interface in area ten. And there is no redistribution running here as of now. I'll go to router two and try to do the same thing there. IPV is six-way unicasting. IPV six, Oscar one.

You can see the same message here. So it becomes mandatory for me to manually configure the outage and get the interface S one by zero, IPV six, OSPF one, area zero, and interface F zero by zero, IPV six, OSPF one, area zero, done. So I just configured the router to put both interfaces in the same area, which is area zero as per the type.

So this is something very basic lab. You can now try some advanced OSPF labs, just like we have an IP version 4, and you can do so. I can see both interfaces in area 0 when I try to verify the IPV6 protocols. When we configure OSPF, the first thing we try to do is verify the neighborhood, because if the neighbourhood is up, the routers will exchange routing updates and communicate with each other. You can see the neighbourhood between the outer two router one.

You can see the output is exactly the same. The only difference is that we use IPV6 OSPF neighbors, and we need to show IPV6 OSPF routes to verify the routing table. Now you can see the router one's land interface in my routing table as Oi route. So whenever you see Oi, o represents OSPF routes, and i represents OSP interior routes.

And if I try to pin to the router-one line interface, I can pin; if you want to trace, you can trace; it's the same thing. So this is the way we configure IP version six OSPFs. Now, whenever you configure IP version six of OSPF, the main thing we need to remember is the router ID. This is one thing we need to remember: the routerID has to be in IP version 4 format only.

It's always the best practise to give the manuals already, and then this command is more equivalent, except that IPV6 is something we need to add before, and then instead of network commands, we enable the protocol under the interface. That's it. So whenever you enable the protocol under the interface, whatever IPV6 is present on that interface will be advertised into OSPO in whatever area you mentioned. And again, when we are using the areas, you need to keep in mind that area zero should be the backbone. If you want areas 10 and 20 to communicate with each other, they should go via area 0. And if something is missing, you must use virtual links, etc. Everything is identical to what we did in IP version 4 OSPR.

7. EIGRP - IPv6

EHRP protocol for IP version six If you recall the EHRP we used in IP version 4, the concept of EHRP is identical to what we learned in IP version 4. So it's a combination of distance vector and the links to protocols called "advanced distance vector protocols." This is referred to as a "hybrid protocol." Furthermore, EHRP for IP versions 6 supports multi-protocol. Like it not only supports IP version 4, it supports IPX and Iptoc protocols, and now it also supports IP version 6—that's what we call EHRP 6. It's easier to set up and has faster conversion times than IP version four.

When it comes to features, the calculation, process, and metrics are exactly the same as what we learned in IP version four. So, before we move on with this, I expect you to know the basic configurations of IP version 4, EHRP, and how the protocol works. So let's try to get into the configuration of EHRP for IP version six. Now I need to confirm that I have a simple topology. We'll stick with the same two routers, and what I'll do with these two routers is I'm going to configure both the routers in EHRP with the same number, 100, just like we do. We configure EHRP with autonomous system members here. also need to use any one member.

So I'm going to say EHRP 100 for IP Version 6, and I want to make sure the router's one-line interface should be able to pinto the router's two-line interface through the EHRP protocol. So, let us see how to configure to make this possible. So the syntax is more similar to IP version four. In the case of IP version 4, we go to the router and say "EHRP." We must define one number, which we call the "autonomous system number." And this number must be the same on both routes in order to establish a neighbour deal, exchange the routes, and communicate.

So, if this number did not match, say 102 hundred on the other side, they would not form a neighborhood. So if you want a successful neighbour relationship between both routers, the ace number must match, and then we need to give no or summary any way to disable that, and the network command, whatever the network, let's say tend or network, to advertise our interfaces. In the case of IP version six, we do something similar. So on the router, I'm going to try to configure it as per my scenario.

We must enter configuration mode on router 1, and then enable the IPV6 protocol on router EHRP 100 within configuration mode. Now, this command is more equivalent to the first command in IP version four. The only difference is we start with an IPV-6 router, EHRP 100. So once you use this command, we go into router mode. Now, once we are in router mode, we need to give a command called "no shutdown." This is something extracommandary that we frequently discovered.

We didn't find this kind of command in the previous protocols. No shut-down command Now, what exactly does this "no shutdown" command do? Does it do the same kind of job as our physical interface? In order to bring up the interface, we must issue the no shutdown command, as we did with our physical interface. Because by default, each and every physical interface of the iOS routers is in a shut-down state. Now, in a similar way, even though you configure EHRP, by default, the EHRP process will be in a shutdown state, and if you don't give it the no-shutdown flag, the EHRP process will not come up.

Now, this is something to remember; it is mandatory. If you do not use the no shutdown command, the EHRP neighbourhood will not function because the EHRP process will be in a shutdown state and will not initiate any messages on the other side.

And then there's one more extra command I have seen in different IBAS versions. So, route-ready concept The routerity concept is now identical to IP version 4, the Osprey browser ID. But I have seen in some of the iOS routeriddy that it becomes optional. Sometimes it is optional in some iOS versions and not mandatory in others. I've noticed that if you don't take this route, it won't take the EHR and may fail to establish the neighborhood. So keep this route ready as an option here.

However, this varies depending on the iOS version. Okay? So far, I'm not providing any commands that are required in any iOS version, and route ID is dependent on the scenario. So if it takes an automatic router, in that case, it may not be required. Okay? So now here's one important thing we need to remember. The "no shutdown" command is something we need to remember. And the next thing is to advertise the interfaces. So we don't have any network commands in IPversion 6; just like we do it in EHRPor Rip, we need to go to the interface. What is the interface here? Most are important because Interface F zero by zero is in configuration mode. And inside the interface mode, we need to say IPV 6 and EHRP 100.

Similarly, what is the other interface? I'm going to use Interface S one by one. That is my van interface. IPV six, EHRP 100. Now, this command enables advertisements for all six IPV services present on our interface through EHRP 100. As you can see, this part is similar to how we enabled the protocol in OSPF or RIP on the interface. But when it comes to the routing configurations, noshadow and command are things we need to remember. So that is something we are not used to seeing on command in another outer mode, but here you will find it. Let's see if we can get into configuration here.

Try to configure the same for routers. I already have IPV6 and OSP running because of my previous lab. If you remember, I enabled OSP in my previous lab. So I'm going to remove that OSPF before I get into my EHRP. So whenever you're doing any lab, just make sure that you're not running any other protocol that might conflict with your routing configurations. So if I verify "Show IPV Six Protocols," I don't see a single protocol running on my routers. Now I need to make sure that routers One and Two form the label ship and exchange routers using the EHRP protocol. So first thing, I'll go with the country mode as a route: PV Six router EHRP 100. You can always try different cushions to see what other options are available.

It is the same as what we have done, and no shut-down command is required. Then you can see on iOS that it's not accepting the Outrage command. There's no route-ready command, which means I think it works without the command. But in some iOS versions, you will find out. The ready command will also be displayed. Okay, so I'm not using an authority command because of my Ibiz version here. It's not supporting, and hopefully it will work with EHRP here. To provide advice, I need to enter IPV 60 and HRP 100 into the interface. And what is the other interface I'm using? S divided by one. IPV six, EHRP 100. And for verification, we can use six IPV protocols. I can see the K values. Whatever we have learned in IP version 4, it's going to be the same. Administrative editions will also be the same, as will the maximum Hopkins variance; everything is the same. So there will be no differences in specifications, features, or functionality; it will be the same protocol. So, EHR, you're running? V 100.

So, we've been routed; no usable doctor has been found. You'll see this, right? There is no router default that can be used. Now this might create a problem. So I'll go to my interface and simply configure IPV because this iOS version isn't going down that path. So what I'll do is expect the route to be taken automatically. So, for that, I'm going to configure an IP address like 112-5500 or something to ensure that it takes the router. It has now taken root, as you can see. Now, if you are not able to find the routerity command in some of the Ibis versions, I suggest you just go and configure an IPV4 address on any of the interfaces. And the majority of the previous network is running IP version 4.

So, unless you are completely starting from scratch with an IPV-6 network, you will very rarely find IP version four in any network. So now you can see that this is a very important thing. This is important to remember because routeride is an optional feature. Why? Because if the routeride command is not supported, the highest IP address from the loop bag or, if no loop bag exists, the highest IP address of the physical interface will be used. But, no, the Sharon command is something you must do. So it's always the best practise to check to see whether it has taken the router or not. And EHRP is running here at 100.

So before giving the router ID, you saw this kind of message. So you need to watch out for these things. So I'm going to do the same thing with the IPVSix router EHR V 100, and here also I'll create one loopback interface just for router purposes, 222-5500. So I'm going to say IPV-6, EHRP-100, and then there had to be no Sharon command, and not-yet-command is not supported in this service. And then we need to advertise IPV 6/8/100, and what is the other interface? IPV Six, EHRP 100 So once you finish up the advertisements, I'm expecting some message to come up. The neighbour ship message shows IPV six protocols.

You can see these two interfaces are running or otherwise in EHRP 100, and I'm expecting the neighborhood. So how to verify the neighborhood? Show IPVSix EHRP neighbours. I'm not able to see the neighbor's ship still; let me check it out. Did I overlook any commands in your router? I think so, so let's verify once again what the commands we have given are. As a result, IPV six routers, HR V 100 I believe I forwarded no shut on command to you. Let me try to join the queue once again.

On-command rotary HRV 100 no shad So the problem could be similar to that on the router: if I show IPC protocols now, you won't see a single interface displayed here. The issue now could be that I installed this interface before the router. Let me try one more time. So I'm going to give interface zero IPV six EHRP 100 and interface S 10 IPV six EHRP 100.

If I give showIPV six protocols, I'm not able to see any interfaces in this video; that's something I'm expecting. IPV 60 HR, IP 100 Okay, you can see the neighbouring ship has come up. So what I did is, just now, I tried to remove the IP version six EHRP just now, and then I tried the same thing again, recounting the same thing with the same command, no Shingle command. But if you see here, I have given a router command. When I tried with iOS help, it's not taking, but when I type the complete command, so when I say router EHRP100, you can see that when I use the tap button or question mark, it's not going to show me. But if I give it the opportunity, it's going to take it.

So you should probably look into these commands. Sometimes some of the Ibis support these options. I have seen some of theibis; they have route-ready commands. So this Ibis is not showing up in the options. So, once I manually configured the router, it established a neighbour relationship. Okay, so remember that no shutdown and router are required commands, and unless EHRP automatically picks up any router functionality in that case, it becomes optional.

But it's always the best practise to use the route information manually in the case of EHRP. Then no show on command and verification; show IPV six EHRP neighbors; show IPV six EHRP neighbors; show IPV six EHRP neighbors. We can see that router one is establishing a neighbourhood with a link local address. Instead of neighbour addresses, it now displays links on that interface, and the remaining output is identical to IP version 4 EHRP.

And then to verify the routing table, you can use show IPV 6 Ehrp. I can see the route of the router's two-line interface learned through D; nothing but D represents EHRP, and if I try to ping the router's two-line interface, I should be able to ping the router's two-line interface. You can see now that there are a few important things to consider when you configure EHRP for IP versions. If there is one thing to remember, it is that these two commands, particularly the no-Sharon command, are required, and it is best practise to provide the outerity as well in case it is unable to pick the router ID. In that case, it will not show you any message saying that. Unable to pick the route, please configure the router manually.

It's not going to show any messages in that case. Definitely, you get into these kinds of issues like the ones we just came across. So it's always best practise to give you the manual in case it is not able to pick. So the best way is to just keep the route Friday manually, and then to advise interfaces, just go to the interface, and we do enable IPV6, EHRP, or whatever the number is, and this number must match on both sides in order to have a successful neighbour relationship.

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