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101-500: LPIC-1 Exam 101 Certification Video Training Course

The complete solution to prepare for for your exam with 101-500: LPIC-1 Exam 101 certification video training course. The 101-500: LPIC-1 Exam 101 certification video training course contains a complete set of videos that will provide you with thorough knowledge to understand the key concepts. Top notch prep including LPI 101-500 exam dumps, study guide & practice test questions and answers.

138 Students Enrolled
125 Lectures
02:51:00 Hours

101-500: LPIC-1 Exam 101 Certification Video Training Course Exam Curriculum

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1

Introduction

1 Lectures
Time 00:11:00
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Preperation of practice

4 Lectures
Time 00:38:00
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Introduction to the console

1 Lectures
Time 00:23:00
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4

101.1 Determine and configure hardware settings

4 Lectures
Time 00:44:00
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101.2 Boot the system

5 Lectures
Time 00:55:00
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101.3 Change runlevels / boot targets and shutdown or reboot system

2 Lectures
Time 00:27:00
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102.1: Plan hard disk partitioning

5 Lectures
Time 01:02:00
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102.2: Install a boot manager

2 Lectures
Time 00:16:00
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102.3: Manage shared libraries

1 Lectures
Time 00:13:00
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102.4: Use debian package management

3 Lectures
Time 00:38:00
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102.5: Using RPM and YUM package management

3 Lectures
Time 00:34:00
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102.6: Linux as guest virtualization

1 Lectures
Time 00:15:00
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103.1: Working on the command line

2 Lectures
Time 00:32:00
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103.2: Process text streams with filters

6 Lectures
Time 01:07:00
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103.3: Basic file management

8 Lectures
Time 02:02:00
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103.4: Using streams, pipes and diversions

2 Lectures
Time 00:39:00
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103.5: Create, monitor and terminate processes

5 Lectures
Time 01:03:00
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103.6: Change process execution priorities

1 Lectures
Time 00:09:00
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103.7: Searching text files with regular expressions

1 Lectures
Time 00:16:00
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103.8: Basic editing of files

2 Lectures
Time 00:26:00
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104.1: Create partitions and file systems

3 Lectures
Time 00:47:00
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104.2: Ensuring the integrity of file systems

4 Lectures
Time 00:27:00
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104.3: Controlling the mounting and unmounting of file systems

3 Lectures
Time 00:29:00
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104.5: Manage file access rights and ownership

4 Lectures
Time 00:55:00
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104.6: Creating and changing symbolic and hard links

1 Lectures
Time 00:11:00
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104.7: Find system files and put files in the right place

1 Lectures
Time 00:13:00
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105.1: Customize and use the shell environment

2 Lectures
Time 00:31:00
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105.2: Adapt or write simple scripts

7 Lectures
Time 01:19:00
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106.1: Install and configure X11

4 Lectures
Time 00:38:00
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106.2: Graphic desktops

1 Lectures
Time 00:09:00
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106.3: Accessibility

1 Lectures
Time 00:10:00
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107.1: Manage user and group accounts and associated system files

2 Lectures
Time 00:26:00
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33

107.2: Automate system administration tasks by scheduling jobs

4 Lectures
Time 00:52:00
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107.3: Localization and Internationalization

3 Lectures
Time 00:47:00
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108.1: Manage the system time

2 Lectures
Time 00:43:00
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36

108.2: System logging

2 Lectures
Time 00:28:00
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108.3: Basics of Mail Transfer Agents (MTA)

1 Lectures
Time 00:17:00
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38

108.4: Manage printers and printing processes

1 Lectures
Time 00:20:00
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109.1: Basics of Internet Protocols

4 Lectures
Time 01:17:00
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109.2: Persistent network configuration

3 Lectures
Time 00:33:00
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109.3: Basic Network Troubleshooting

4 Lectures
Time 00:49:00
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109.4: Configuring the client-side DNS

1 Lectures
Time 00:10:00
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110.1: Perform security administration tasks

2 Lectures
Time 00:25:00
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110.2: Securing a computer

1 Lectures
Time 00:17:00
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110.3: Protecting data with encryption

5 Lectures
Time 01:08:00

Introduction

  • 11:00

Preperation of practice

  • 5:00
  • 17:00
  • 11:00
  • 5:00

Introduction to the console

  • 23:00

101.1 Determine and configure hardware settings

  • 11:00
  • 5:00
  • 17:00
  • 11:00

101.2 Boot the system

  • 13:00
  • 7:00
  • 19:00
  • 6:00
  • 10:00

101.3 Change runlevels / boot targets and shutdown or reboot system

  • 10:00
  • 17:00

102.1: Plan hard disk partitioning

  • 24:00
  • 6:00
  • 15:00
  • 8:00
  • 9:00

102.2: Install a boot manager

  • 8:00
  • 8:00

102.3: Manage shared libraries

  • 13:00

102.4: Use debian package management

  • 14:00
  • 16:00
  • 8:00

102.5: Using RPM and YUM package management

  • 14:00
  • 14:00
  • 6:00

102.6: Linux as guest virtualization

  • 15:00

103.1: Working on the command line

  • 13:00
  • 19:00

103.2: Process text streams with filters

  • 13:00
  • 3:00
  • 9:00
  • 10:00
  • 22:00
  • 10:00

103.3: Basic file management

  • 23:00
  • 19:00
  • 21:00
  • 7:00
  • 20:00
  • 11:00
  • 10:00
  • 11:00

103.4: Using streams, pipes and diversions

  • 31:00
  • 8:00

103.5: Create, monitor and terminate processes

  • 21:00
  • 17:00
  • 6:00
  • 17:00
  • 2:00

103.6: Change process execution priorities

  • 9:00

103.7: Searching text files with regular expressions

  • 16:00

103.8: Basic editing of files

  • 15:00
  • 11:00

104.1: Create partitions and file systems

  • 13:00
  • 24:00
  • 10:00

104.2: Ensuring the integrity of file systems

  • 7:00
  • 8:00
  • 7:00
  • 5:00

104.3: Controlling the mounting and unmounting of file systems

  • 9:00
  • 10:00
  • 10:00

104.5: Manage file access rights and ownership

  • 17:00
  • 17:00
  • 8:00
  • 13:00

104.6: Creating and changing symbolic and hard links

  • 11:00

104.7: Find system files and put files in the right place

  • 13:00

105.1: Customize and use the shell environment

  • 14:00
  • 17:00

105.2: Adapt or write simple scripts

  • 10:00
  • 14:00
  • 30:00
  • 8:00
  • 7:00
  • 6:00
  • 4:00

106.1: Install and configure X11

  • 10:00
  • 11:00
  • 14:00
  • 3:00

106.2: Graphic desktops

  • 9:00

106.3: Accessibility

  • 10:00

107.1: Manage user and group accounts and associated system files

  • 20:00
  • 6:00

107.2: Automate system administration tasks by scheduling jobs

  • 19:00
  • 9:00
  • 15:00
  • 9:00

107.3: Localization and Internationalization

  • 14:00
  • 22:00
  • 11:00

108.1: Manage the system time

  • 17:00
  • 26:00

108.2: System logging

  • 14:00
  • 14:00

108.3: Basics of Mail Transfer Agents (MTA)

  • 17:00

108.4: Manage printers and printing processes

  • 20:00

109.1: Basics of Internet Protocols

  • 14:00
  • 26:00
  • 23:00
  • 14:00

109.2: Persistent network configuration

  • 18:00
  • 9:00
  • 6:00

109.3: Basic Network Troubleshooting

  • 11:00
  • 18:00
  • 12:00
  • 8:00

109.4: Configuring the client-side DNS

  • 10:00

110.1: Perform security administration tasks

  • 13:00
  • 12:00

110.2: Securing a computer

  • 17:00

110.3: Protecting data with encryption

  • 18:00
  • 8:00
  • 16:00
  • 9:00
  • 17:00
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About 101-500: LPIC-1 Exam 101 Certification Video Training Course

101-500: LPIC-1 Exam 101 certification video training course by prepaway along with practice test questions and answers, study guide and exam dumps provides the ultimate training package to help you pass.

102.5: Using RPM and YUM package management

1. Rpm

This lesson is about the RPM package management system. So we have to switch to our Fedora system, or Send OS, or Red Hat, or something like that. Originally, the abbreviation meant "Red Hat Package Management," so to speak. The equivalent of Dpkg Today, this system is still called RPM but no longer uses reset package management but only RPM package management. Rpm is used by Red Hat and Fedora Centaursor by Sousa for this lesson, and as I mentioned, you should use Fedora if you installed it exactly as I described in the first videos.

Let's take a look at the Rpm.man page. Rpm package manager, so here is a little description. Rpm. is a powerful package manager that can be used to build instant queries, verify, update, and erase individual software packages. And every time you come here, you have different options. For this example, I downloaded the corresponding Skype package from the Skype website, so I'm now in my download folder, and here I have the Skype for Linux 64-bit RPM package. This time, of course, the package has the ending rpm instead of deb, and with rpm we can look at which files are installed in which directories.

The command isrpm QPL skype for Linux rpm before installation. The query queue is the apt cache's counterpart. The P stands for package, and the L stands for list files. So translated, rpm should list everything that the package contains. So here we see the individual files and the corresponding directory structure of the upcoming installation. With the following command, we can display various information about the package. By the way, this is a fairly good summary. The I stands for information, so rpmQPI and then Skype for Linux. And we can see here the name, the version, the architecture, the license, and a little description. Or, in this case, the description is empty—the URL, the vendor, and so on. If we now want to install the program, we would use the following command: sudo rpm, with the option I, which stands for "install." Then there's the Skype for Linux RPM, which makes me skeptical. Linux was successfully installed, and as I already said, Rpm is the equivalent of Dpkg and older Skype and Fedora versions.

We had the exact same problem that we had with a discord example in Debian: RPM cannot solve missing dependencies automatically. In this case, there are no missing dependencies, so everything worked fine, but please keep in mind that if there are missing dependencies, rpm cannot automatically resolve them. Of course, with RPM, we can check which packages are installed on our system. We would use the following commands: RPM and then the options Q and A. Q stands for query, as I said. and A stands for all. And here we have a list of all the packages installed on the system. So with this command, we can search for installed programmes, for example, with Grep and then Skype.

And then we get the information that we have Skype already installed. The long version of the options rpm query all can be used here, and the result is the same. If we want to delete Skype right now, we can use the sudorpm command with the option e Skype for Linux. The E stands for erase, and now Skype for Linux should be deleted. Let's check that with Rpmqa, and Skype appears to be deleted. If we had now installed the program and a new version of Skype had become available in the meantime, we could use the RPM updater to update the package. The command is as follows: rpm U stands for Update, and then Skype for Linux rpm if that is the correct package name. But as we have no updated version here, no new version, I cannot show that. Keep in mind, however, that the RPM with the Uoption in capital letters stands for "update this package here." Another great feature RPM offers is that, with the correct option, you can find out which package a particular file originally came from.

If we, for example, want to know from which package the in tub file originally came, we can find that out with Rpmqf. And here is the result. The file in it comes from the package system d minus two, four, six, and so on. I know I am repeating myself, but I would really like to point out that RPM contains a lot of different options and that you should definitely take a look at them. Please try some different options at home. Learn them. It will be helpful for your exam. You won't need to know all of them, but I recommend that you study them in great detail. The command RPM to CPIO is also included in the LPI list. For this lesson, we take a look at the main page. Extract the CPIO Archive from the RPM package manager. rpmconvert converts the RPM file specified as a single argument to an ONSTANDARD out CPIO archive.

The command therefore converts an RPM file into a CPIO file. CPIO is an archiving tool that can be used to create archives or copy files into or out of archives. So, when we run the command rpm to install CPIOSkype for Linux, we get an error message. This is because the result cannot be output on the terminal. We have to explicitly transfer the result that we get into a CPIO file with the following command: Skype for Linux CPIO, for example, and now we see that we have a Skype for Linux. CPIO file now, which we can work on with the command CPIO. But that command we are talking about In a later lesson, we could forward an Rpm package to a CPIO package and then just unpack it in the same way.

You could use Rpm to CPIO and then Skype for Linux, pipe CPIO, and the options in EDB to accomplish this. And we can see that there is a new directory here, user CD pin. And then here's our Skype for Linux. The binary files that we actually included in the Rpm package We can now be found on our hard drive, unpacked. It is now not installed in such a way that it would work. It is more that it is briefly unpacked to just take a look at what the individual files look like and so on. But I think that it should be enough at this point. Now CPIO is a later topic in the Epic exam. You don't have to know much about it, of course. You can also take a look at the main page here and try out a little something. But as I said, we will talk about it later, but in a very short period of time.

2. Yum

This lesson is about yum. Yum is the abbreviation for "yellow document"; modified yum was originally developed for the yellow document Linux distribution but now runs on many other Linux distributions. For example, Red Hat, CentOS, or Fedora Like its counterpart, Apt, Yam can install, update, or uninstall packages. Yam uses a complete directory as a list for its online repositories. The directory is Etsy Yam Repos. Let's take a look at the directory myfaultyamdotrepos, and we see that there are several files here. We will pick one out and look at its content.

For example, when Fedora updates its repository, we see the corresponding web addresses here, which Yamthen accesses when searching behind these addresses. Behind these addresses are mountains of software that were all created for the corresponding distribution and also extensively tested. Let me leave this file again. To update the system to the latest version, we would now use the following command: Pseudo-Yam Update again; for comparison with Apt Update, it only causes the list of package sources to be updated and rewritten to cache. However, this does not update the system itself. With Yum, updates actually update the system. Make sure you remember this for the exam, okay? You see, we have many updates. There are 945 megabytes of updates here. In this case, I would say no. I don't want to update the system at the moment because, for our course, that is not important to update. It is only important to see what the command is. And it is a pseudo-Yam update for the system update. And now I press "no," so no updates are made. Now we would like, for example, to install the programme h top.We will see if we can find it at all and use the following command: It takes some time to search the internet. As a result, we see a distinction between "exact hits" and "normal hits." So the package names contain the word "htop" somewhere. In that case, the package found here has nothing to do with AgeTop or the programme that we are looking for.

I think that's the one we were looking for. We have now obviously found the appropriate edge-top package. There is also a Yum command that can show us further information about this package, and that is Yuminfo. And then we are using the package name h top dotx 86 86 four, and here we get some more detailed information like name version, release, architecture five, and so on. Now let's just install this package here. Of course, we have to use sudo again. sudoyum install --stop Yes, we want to install it. The programme was now downloaded and installed; any missing dependencies, if any, are automatically resolved. So let's try out whether the programme works. Yes, it works. So Yum, stop this again. Of course, there is a command that displays all of the programmes that have already been installed, which in this case is the Yum list.

And here we see a huge list of installed packages. Of course, we can use the Grep command again to filter the results in this case. So, for example, we have Yam List installed, then Pipe Grab Host, and here's our installed Edge Top program. If we now want to delete hop again, we can use the following command: pseudo yum remove stop We were asked again whether the programmer should really be deleted, and we confirmed again with "yes," and now it's deleted. Perhaps it was now a bad example to use Edgetop because no dependencies were installed during the installation since the programme obviously does not need any further files or they already exist. If the programme now had dependencies, then those with the Yum remove command would not have been deleted as well, like the counterpart with Apt. However, you must manually remove them using pseudo-Yum autorem. There's nothing to do here. You may recall that it was essentially the same command with Aptit. It was a pseudo-apt auto Remove.A very interesting feature of Yum is that we can display which package contains a particular file. Yum, for example, provides and the programme D message.

And now the source of the message package has been shown to us. A very interesting tool is the young downloader tool. With the young downloader, you can download the corresponding RPM package without installing it directly. Under certain circumstances, Yum Downloader has to be installed first. The corresponding package is yam utilspseudo yam install, followed by Yam utils. Yes. Here we also see what it looks like when dependencies have to be installed. Of course, we have already confirmed at the top that this should install the dependencies, update existing files, and so on. Now we can call up the young downloader, and we then simply download the Htop package again, but this time without installing it. But, before we use the Yum downloader command, we must return to our home directory because we are currently in the Etsy Yum repos folder. And in this folder, we have no write permissions. So Yamdo would not work here. So we are going back to the city home.Or we are just using this one. That's a short cut for our home directory. So now I'm back in my home directory, and now I'm using Yam Downloader with the programme h top.

We no longer had any error messages, and the Htop packages package had been successfully downloaded. We have it here. So it worked perfectly. Concerning Yum, there are a lot more options to use, but I think we have covered the most important ones here. But as always, I have to mention: please study the main page, try out some different things, and learn the different options for the exam.

3. Zipper

So far, knowing DBN and Red Hat's package management systems, such as Dpkg, Apt, Rpm, and Yum, has sufficed. Zipper is now included in Epic One Exam version 50. Zipper is a command-line interface and belongs to Lip Zip, which is also a package management system that can also resolve missing dependencies itself. Zipper is mainly used by Opensourcer. In theory, you can also install Zipper on other systems. With Ubuntu.

The installation works flawlessly with "pseudo apt install zipper." However, it cannot be used because Zipper only supports YaST-2 and RPM metadata package depots. There are probably ways to use it on Ubuntu; otherwise, the corresponding package would not be available. But it should hardly be our task to figure out how to get Zipper to run in Ubuntu.

Instead, I simply downloaded a Sous-V container, with which I'd like to demonstrate how zipper works briefly. I'm trying to keep this video short because I don't think there will be many questions about it in the exam. We should go through the most important things briefly. In this case, the command zipper se Htop can be used to search for the Htop package zipper se Htop, where Se stands for Shift Search. The first search always takes a little longer because the cache has to be created first. So, after a few seconds, HOP was discovered here. If we want to install HOP now, we use the following command: pseudo zipper install HOP The command could not be found.

Okay, interesting. I think we are already rooted here in this container, so this should work. The following new package will be installed: Yes, no, yes, and HTML is already installed. Let's test it with HTML, and yes, it works with Q. We can quit Edge top. Let me clear the screen; the following command can be used to remove the edge top I don't need a double-sudo zipper to remove the edge of my top. Yes, we want to remove it, and now that Edge Top has been removed, let's check if it's really been deleted. There is no such file directory; that's the confirmation that http is no longer on the hard drive. Furthermore, we have a zipper command that lists the available system updates with zipper list updates.

If updates are available, you can install them with the following command: pseudo zipper update, but in our case, no updates were found. So we cannot use this command now, but I don't need sudo. Sorry. Cannot use. It will not install, however, because there is nothing to do. The corresponding zipper repositories can be viewed with the following command: "zipper repos," and here are our zipper repositories. Since zipper is a new topic in the Epic One exam, I do not expect many questions here, and if so, no detailed ones. Of course, you can also install and open through the system, browse the main pages, and experiment with various options. And yeah, as a small tip, as mentioned at the beginning, you can install Zipper on Ubuntu. It can't be used, but at least you have access to the main pages that you can then use to study. You now know how packages are installed. which is why I'm not going into more detail at this point.

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