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N10-008: CompTIA Network+ Certification Video Training Course

The complete solution to prepare for for your exam with N10-008: CompTIA Network+ certification video training course. The N10-008: CompTIA Network+ certification video training course contains a complete set of videos that will provide you with thorough knowledge to understand the key concepts. Top notch prep including CompTIA N10-008 exam dumps, study guide & practice test questions and answers.

132 Students Enrolled
211 Lectures
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N10-008: CompTIA Network+ Certification Video Training Course Exam Curriculum

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1

Module 1 - Introducing Reference Models and Protocols

7 Lectures
Time 01:01:00
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Module 2: Network Pieces and Parts

12 Lectures
Time 00:50:00
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Module 3: Stay on Top of Your Topologies

17 Lectures
Time 00:45:00
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Module 4 - Understanding Network Services

12 Lectures
Time 01:20:00
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Module 5 - Selecting WAN Technologies

14 Lectures
Time 00:57:00
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Module 6:Connecting Networks with Cables and Connectors

13 Lectures
Time 01:14:00
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Module 7 - Using Ethernet Switches

16 Lectures
Time 01:26:00
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Module 8 - Demystifying Wireless Networks

7 Lectures
Time 00:39:00
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Module 9 - Addressing Networks with IPv4

14 Lectures
Time 01:01:00
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Module 10 - Addressing Networks with IPv6

18 Lectures
Time 00:50:00
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Module 11 - Explaining IP Routing

9 Lectures
Time 01:09:00
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Module 12:Streaming Voice and Video with united communications

7 Lectures
Time 01:03:00
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Module 12 - Virtualizing Network Devices

9 Lectures
Time 00:40:00
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Module 14 - Securing a Network

23 Lectures
Time 02:21:00
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Module 15 - Monitoring and Analyzing Networks

6 Lectures
Time 00:29:00
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Module: Examining Best Practices for Network Administration

13 Lectures
Time 01:12:00
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Module 17 - Troubleshooting Networks

10 Lectures
Time 01:19:00
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Module 18: Preparing for the CompTIA Network+ Exam

4 Lectures
Time 00:16:00

Module 1 - Introducing Reference Models and Protocols

  • 1:00
  • 10:00
  • 3:00
  • 9:00
  • 15:00
  • 5:00
  • 18:00

Module 2: Network Pieces and Parts

  • 1:00
  • 4:00
  • 6:00
  • 10:00
  • 5:00
  • 2:00
  • 5:00
  • 4:00
  • 2:00
  • 2:00
  • 6:00
  • 3:00

Module 3: Stay on Top of Your Topologies

  • 3:00
  • 4:00
  • 3:00
  • 3:00
  • 2:00
  • 2:00
  • 1:00
  • 2:00
  • 2:00
  • 1:00
  • 3:00
  • 3:00
  • 2:00
  • 1:00
  • 3:00
  • 6:00
  • 4:00

Module 4 - Understanding Network Services

  • 1:00
  • 10:00
  • 5:00
  • 3:00
  • 5:00
  • 8:00
  • 10:00
  • 12:00
  • 4:00
  • 7:00
  • 9:00
  • 6:00

Module 5 - Selecting WAN Technologies

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  • 2:00
  • 5:00
  • 2:00
  • 2:00
  • 4:00
  • 2:00
  • 3:00
  • 3:00
  • 4:00
  • 14:00
  • 8:00
  • 4:00
  • 3:00

Module 6:Connecting Networks with Cables and Connectors

  • 1:00
  • 9:00
  • 4:00
  • 5:00
  • 6:00
  • 2:00
  • 4:00
  • 7:00
  • 15:00
  • 2:00
  • 2:00
  • 5:00
  • 12:00

Module 7 - Using Ethernet Switches

  • 1:00
  • 5:00
  • 7:00
  • 3:00
  • 4:00
  • 9:00
  • 3:00
  • 4:00
  • 2:00
  • 9:00
  • 7:00
  • 3:00
  • 13:00
  • 9:00
  • 2:00
  • 5:00

Module 8 - Demystifying Wireless Networks

  • 1:00
  • 5:00
  • 5:00
  • 1:00
  • 5:00
  • 19:00
  • 3:00

Module 9 - Addressing Networks with IPv4

  • 1:00
  • 6:00
  • 1:00
  • 3:00
  • 8:00
  • 5:00
  • 4:00
  • 7:00
  • 4:00
  • 4:00
  • 4:00
  • 3:00
  • 7:00
  • 4:00

Module 10 - Addressing Networks with IPv6

  • 1:00
  • 8:00
  • 4:00
  • 3:00
  • 2:00
  • 3:00
  • 4:00
  • 3:00
  • 2:00
  • 1:00
  • 3:00
  • 3:00
  • 4:00
  • 2:00
  • 3:00
  • 1:00
  • 2:00
  • 1:00

Module 11 - Explaining IP Routing

  • 1:00
  • 7:00
  • 3:00
  • 12:00
  • 9:00
  • 15:00
  • 14:00
  • 5:00
  • 3:00

Module 12:Streaming Voice and Video with united communications

  • 1:00
  • 10:00
  • 9:00
  • 7:00
  • 15:00
  • 14:00
  • 7:00

Module 12 - Virtualizing Network Devices

  • 1:00
  • 7:00
  • 8:00
  • 4:00
  • 2:00
  • 7:00
  • 2:00
  • 6:00
  • 3:00

Module 14 - Securing a Network

  • 1:00
  • 19:00
  • 2:00
  • 6:00
  • 10:00
  • 4:00
  • 2:00
  • 9:00
  • 11:00
  • 3:00
  • 7:00
  • 14:00
  • 5:00
  • 9:00
  • 5:00
  • 6:00
  • 4:00
  • 5:00
  • 3:00
  • 6:00
  • 4:00
  • 2:00
  • 4:00

Module 15 - Monitoring and Analyzing Networks

  • 1:00
  • 8:00
  • 5:00
  • 7:00
  • 3:00
  • 5:00

Module: Examining Best Practices for Network Administration

  • 1:00
  • 6:00
  • 7:00
  • 5:00
  • 4:00
  • 4:00
  • 5:00
  • 3:00
  • 10:00
  • 8:00
  • 10:00
  • 7:00
  • 2:00

Module 17 - Troubleshooting Networks

  • 1:00
  • 12:00
  • 20:00
  • 10:00
  • 3:00
  • 2:00
  • 6:00
  • 7:00
  • 12:00
  • 6:00

Module 18: Preparing for the CompTIA Network+ Exam

  • 1:00
  • 4:00
  • 7:00
  • 4:00
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About N10-008: CompTIA Network+ Certification Video Training Course

N10-008: CompTIA Network+ certification video training course by prepaway along with practice test questions and answers, study guide and exam dumps provides the ultimate training package to help you pass.

Module 6:Connecting Networks with Cables and Connectors

6. 6.5 Media Converters

In this fairly short video, we want to simply define a term. And that term is "media converter." And a media converter can really help us out when we have one type of cable. Maybe it's a multimode fiber, maybe a singlemode fiber, maybe coax, maybe a twisted pair. But the equipment to which we intend to connect that media requires something else. But the great news is we can have these media converters, much like you see pictured here on the screen, that can convert back and forth between a single-mode fiber, for example, and an Ethernet connection that might use an RJ-45 connector. We could convert between multimode fibre and Ethernet.

Now, this is really common in a campus environment. You come into a building on multimode fiber, but you want to terminate that on an Ethernet switch that's full of RJ-45 connectors. That's a situation I've run into many times while working at a local university. And I've used dozens of these multimode fibre to Ethernet converters where you can plug in your multimode fiber. And then you get something like a Cat-6 cable to go from this media converter over to your RJ-45 port on an Ethernet switch. Perhaps you have a fibre to coaxial converter, or you're converting between fibre types, such as single mode to multimode.

Maybe there's a long distance between a couple of your locations, for example. So you've used single mode to get between those locations, but then when you come into a specific building, you want to go back to multimode. That's just one example of where you might find a media converter that converts between single-mode fibre and multimode fiber. And these are just examples. We might have other combinations and permutations of media converters. But realise that if you do have some incompatibility between the media that you have and the device into which you wish to connect that media, there might be an option to convert between those two different media types using a media converter.

7. 6.6 Transceivers

When we want to connect to a piece of networking equipment, such as an ethernet switch, we use a high-speed connection, such as a 10 gigabit link. Sometimes we need to use multimode fiber, sometimes we need to use singlemode fiber, and sometimes we need to use an RJ-45 connector. The good news is that we can use transceivers to provide us with various options for connecting to a switch. We insert the transceiver into the switch. These are easily swappable. We do not have to parity the switch. And we insert a transceiver for whatever media type we wish to connect at whatever speed. Now, here we see a transceiver that's called a GBIC.

That's a gigabit interface converter. And this is an older type of transceiver. I remember first using one of these back in the year 2000, and it runs at one gigabit per second. And it's got a couple of fibres coming in, one for transmission and one for reception, and that can slide into a switch that's equipped with a GBA slot. A newer and smaller form factor is called an SFP. This abbreviation stands for small form factor pluggable. And it doesn't take up as much real estate on your networking equipment, though. And you're going to find a variety of speeds when it comes to these smaller transceivers. Some of them might be found in a data centre that uses fibre channel. Some may use one gigabit per second Ethernet.

Again, these are known as SFP transceivers, and their typical bandwidth is one gigabit per second. An enhancement to that is an SFP plus. That's going to typically run at ten gigabits per second. So think about one gigabit per second for a GBIC, one gigabit per second for an SFP transceiver, and ten gigabits per second for an SFP plus transceiver. Now, we can even take it a step further than that. We can have a quad SFP or a quad SFP+ transceiver. If we're using a quad SFP transceiver, then we can have four times the throughput of an SFP transceiver. In other words, instead of one gigabit per second throughput, a quad SFP would give us four gigabits per second. Let's start with the SFP plus. What if we had a quad SFP plus?

Well, that would be four times the speed of an SFP+, which is typically ten gigabits. That's going to give us a 40 gigabit per second transceiver. And again, these transceivers plug into slots that accept a transceiver in some sort of networking equipment, like an Ethernet switch. And if we're using a fibre for transmission and a fibre for reception, which is what we see here on the screen, this is called full duplex operation. This is what we're accustomed to. However, there is a newer technology that's coming along. It's called a bidirectional transceiver, also known as a bidye transceiver. This is going to allow us to use a single fibre optic strand for both transmission and reception. How does that work?

Well, it uses wavelength division multiplexing. In other words, it uses a different wavelength of light for transmission versus reception, which allows the transmit and receive signals to coexist simultaneously on the same fibre optic strand. Now, the transceiver itself is going to cost more than a traditional full-duplex transceiver, where we have a couple of cables. However, if you have long cable runs, think about it. You're having to use twice as much fibre optic cabling if you're doing a full duplex connection, as opposed to using the bi-dye transceiver that transmits and receives on just one strand. So there is a breakeven point, and you might want to analyse this for your installation and duplicate the calculation to figure out where you start saving money when you buy the more expensive dye transceiver but you're having to use just half of the fibre optic cabling.

8. 6.7 Termination Points

In this video, let's talk about where cables get terminated. A really common place to terminate copper cabling is on a 66-block, or at least it used to be very popular. Nowadays, it's more common to have a 110-volt block. But let's take a look at each one of those, the 66 block and the 110 block.

First up, here is a drawing of a 66-block. And if you notice, there are four columns of connectors—these little posts that stick up from the base of the plastic block. And in one of those rows, we have four posts sticking up. And some 66 blocks are designed such that all four of those in that row share a common conductor. But some 66 blocks have two connectors on one side sharing a common conductor and two connectors on the other side of that row that share a different common conductor.

And if you want to interconnect them, you have to put a jumper between the middle two rows. So that's one variation you might see out there. Now let's talk about how we might use this within a building. Let's say that we've got a building with several floors and a wiring closet on every floor. Now, typically in a building, those wiring closets are stacked, meaning that they are on top of one another. And oftentimes there is a hole in the ceiling of one wiring closet, and you can literally see through that hole to the wiring closet just above it. There may be some conduit carrying the wires interconnecting those wiring closets.

And since we're going between floors, we typically have a lot of twisted pairs that we're running. And instead of using just individual cat6 cables as an example, we're probably going to use what is called a riser cable. And a riser cable may have 25 pairs in the cable; it might have 100 twisted pairs, and those would be very tightly bound. It's going to be a lot easier to drop a riser cable from one floor to the other, as opposed to 100 separate Cat 6 cables.

And when we bring in this riser cable, we take those different pairs and untwist them. And then we can start punching down the individual wires on one column of this 66-block, much like I'm highlighting here. And then, on the other side of the row, we might connect cables that go horizontally. In other words, we're going out to different offices on this floor, we've got vertical connections going between floors, and we've got horizontal connections going throughout the floor. So we can run our cables out to the offices on that floor. And we can terminate those individual wires in that fourth column in this block.

But I mentioned that we don't use 66 blocks much these days. The reason for this is that they are more susceptible to crosstalk than a 110 block would be. And 66 blocks are very common within telephone systems like PBXs (private branch exchanges). But nowadays, since we're using Cat 6 or higher, it's really not recommended that we use the 66 block.

Instead, let's use this 110-block. And in both cases, we use a punch-down tool, which often has interchangeable ends, allowing it to work with either a 66- or 110-block. And when you're doing this punching down, what happens is that the metal inside of these posts actually cuts through the insulation on one of the copper wires. And hopefully it's not going to cut the copper, but it is going to cut through the insulation and make an electrical contact with that wire.

And even though I've done a few of these by hand, that's not recommended. We should use some sort of punchdown tool to make a good connection. And sometimes, instead of using a 110 block like this, we might use a patch panel to do our cross connections. This is going to make things a lot easier and a lot cleaner. The wires may still come into this wiring closet from a riser cable, but we're going to terminate all the different pairs in that cable on the back of this patch panel. And that's going to allow us to access those pairs by plugging in an RJ-45 connector. Then we can add something like an Ethernet switch, like you see here at the bottom.

And if I want to connect a PC in some office using the labelling we see here that somebody's done, I know which port goes to which office, and I can cross-connect that into a port in that Ethernet switch. And similarly for fiber, we can have a fibre distribution panel. Now, we're not going to have a fibre punch down. That would not be a good idea, trying to punch down optical fibre made of glass. But what we can do is, much like the patch panel, have the fibre run to different floors or to different offices on this one floor.

And we can have that coming up inside of this fibre distribution panel. And then, once the covers are put over the panel, we don't see the metal part; we just see those connectors sticking out. And then we can plug our networking equipment into those fibre receptacles. And these appear to be ST connectors. And those are some common ways that we can terminate copper or fibre within a building. But another termination point that I want you to know about is when we're connecting it to a WAN, or wide area network.

When we have a wide area network or a Wan provider and they're giving us a Wan circuit physically coming into our building, at some point the responsibility for maintaining that circuit is going to pass from the service provider or the Wan provider to us, the company. And at that point, where the responsibility is passed from the Wan provider to the customer, that's called the demarcation point. or, for short, the demarcation.

Now, sometimes it's just as you enter the building. Maybe it's just outside the building. Maybe it's just inside the building, on a wall. Or sometimes you have a building with multiple tenants. You may have a space on the third floor. Well, in that case, your D-market might need to be extended from the outside of the building up to the third floor.

That's called a D-mark extension. But here, let's just assume that our demarcation point is on the outside of the building. And when they hand us this wire and say, "Hey, it's your responsibility," they rarely just hand us a couple of bare wires. Instead, they might give us something called a "smart jack." Now, a smart jack is a piece of equipment that's going to allow us or a service provider to run some diagnostics on the condition of the weaned circuit. It can give us some meaningful statistics if we're doing troubleshooting.

Here's an example of what a smart jack might look like. And those are a few different ways we might terminate a circuit. Again, to review, if we have PBX equipment or older Cat 3 networks, like we used to see in a lot of ten-meg networks, then we might have 66 blocks. But probably these days, for networking, we're instead going to have 110 blocks.

We also talked about the convenience of having a patch panel and a fibre distribution panel for terminating a WAN circuit. We distinguished between the demarcation point, where the point of responsibility transfers to the customer, and a smartjack, the piece of equipment that's going to allow us or is going to allow the service provider to run some diagnostic tests on that WAN circuit.

9. 6.8 Cabling Tools

In this video, we want to talk about a collection of tools that might come in handy when we're working with different types of cables, maybe as we're doing installation or troubleshooting. The first tool is a crimper. Assume we've run some Cat 6 cable from one location to another and are now ready to plug it into a network switch. Well, it doesn't have an RJ-45 connector on the end of it. So, using a crimper and an RJ-45 connector, we can insert the wires into the empty RJ-45 plug.

Then we squeeze really hard on that crimper, and it crimps it down. It makes connections with those eight wires, and suddenly we've got an RJ-45 connector. And remember, we need to follow appropriate standards when we do that. For example, the T568B standard, which is really common, specifies the colour codes of those wires. The next cabling tool we want to discuss is a cable tester. And this cable tester comes in two pieces, and you can plug a cable into each piece, and it's going to be able to tell us how things are wired up.

Do we have connectivity on all eight of our wires? Is it a straight-through connection? To put it another way, does pinning one on one side imply pinning one on the other? Is it a crossover cable? That's the type of thing we can check out with a cable tester. And we can see if all wires are connecting from an RJ-45 connector on one side of the cable to an RJ-45 connector on the other. and if it's a straight-through connection or not. And we can use a punch-down tool to connect individual wires in an Ethernet cable to the connectors on a 66-block. Or, more commonly, we're going to be using a 110 block today. Or we could alternately punch down those wires on the back of a patch panel. The main goal, though, is to cross-connect those wires with wires going to ports on an Ethernet switch.

We want to make sure that we press down on that wire in such a way that it goes between the blades that are sticking up from the block that are going to cut through the insulation and make contact with the interconnector of that wire. Next up is a very expensive piece of networking test equipment. It's an OTDR, which stands for optical time domain reflectometer. This is something we can use with fibre optic cables. And if we have a cable break somewhere, perhaps between two different buildings on campus, we know that somewhere in our conduit, which may run akilometer, there is a break. How do we find it? Well, using the OTDR, we can isolate very accurately how far down the cable this break occurs. What it's going to do is send light down the fibre optic cable, and it's going to measure any light that gets bounced back to us.

So if there's a break in the fiber, at some point, we're going to get a strong reflection of light that comes back to us. And the way that this tester can determine how far down the cable that break occurs is that it actually measures how long it takes from the time that the light pulse was sent to the time that the light pulse was received. It knows how fast the light is travelling in the medium, and we can tell it what kind of fibre we're using and what wavelength we want to use, and it's able to do the math and measure the speed of propagation of that light inside the medium. You may recall from high school science class that light travels at three times the speed of sound to eight metres per second in a vacuum. If you prefer the English system, the speed is 186 miles per second. Well, light is going to travel a bit slower as it goes down the core of a fiberoptic cable because there are dopants that have been added to that core as it was manufactured. That's going to change its index of refraction.

But when you input that information into the OTDR, it sees that light pulse coming back maybe a certain number of nanoseconds later, and because it's highly calibrated, it can tell us with high accuracy where a break has occurred in the fiber. The first time I used an OTDR, though, it wasn't to detect a break in a fiber. It was to test how good my fibre splice was. I was using a fibre splicing kit, where you would cleave off the ends of these fibers. You would have this gel that connected them together. And you're never going to have a perfect fibre splice. You're always going to lose some light. But once I made the splice, I could use an OTDR to see how much loss happened when the light hit that splice.

Another tool is a Bert tester. Bert. That stands for bit error rate test. And what this can do is generate some load on the network. We can put it under a heavy load, much like the network might be experiencing in a production environment. Perhaps we're just using this as a test bed to see what error rates we get. What we do is send out a pattern of ones and zeros, and we check: did the pattern of ones and zeros that we sent match the pattern that was received? If we're under a heavy load and if we're experiencing errors, what's the rate of those errors? How many errors are we experiencing per second? That's the kind of thing that we can test with this Burt tester. And this tends to be a very expensive piece of testing equipment; something that's a bit less expensive that we can use with our fibre optic cable is a light meter.

If we're concerned that the fibre optic cable may be in one building or on one floor of the building and is not getting light very efficiently to where we are, maybe in a wiring closet, we can put a lightmeter on the other end of that fiber. By the way, we don't want to look at that fibre directly; if a laser is used, it could damage our eyes. But with a light meter, we can just attach the fibre optic cable to the light metre and measure the strength of that light. And that's going to give us some assurance that we do have connectivity, and it's going to show us the strength of that light. Now, sometimes you might see that we're getting light, but it's not very much. A common reason that happens is that we have wound up our fibre optic cable too tightly.

There's a minimum bend radius. When you're installing fibre optic cable, remember how we have different indices of refraction between the core and the cladding? And those indices of refraction are so different that if the fibre is running straight, then the light is going to bounce off of the cladding and back into the core. But if we bend that cable, a lot of the light can start to go out into the cladding, and that's going to make us lose signal. We don't want to bend our fibre too tightly, not because we're afraid we're going to break it, but because it's going to degrade our signal. And oftentimes, when we're working with copper cabling, we'll go into a wiring closet, and it looks a bit like spaghetti.

The wires are just running all over the place, and you're trying to track down a specific wire. Let's say you're trying to find out where a wire from a specific office shows up in the wiring closet. How do you track it down? Well, you can use a tone generator, or sometimes we call this a fox and hound. What you do is go to one end, like the office where the RG-45 connector is, and connect the fox or the tone generator to that connection in the office. Then you go into the wiring closet with yourhound, the tone detector, and you typically hold down a button and wave it around the wires. And when you get close to the wire that's sending the signal from the office, it's going to start making a sound. It might be a solid sound, or it might be a beeping sound, but you can start touching the wires even through the insulation. It's going to let you know very clearly that this is the wire that goes to the office.

And I used one of these recently in my daughter's new home. I was working on the cable connection for her cable modem, and outside the exterior of her house was a cable box. And there were several coaxial cables there that were not terminated; they were just hanging loose in the box. And I needed to find out which coaxial cable went into her living room. So what I did was go to the living room and attach the fox, or in other words, the tone generator. And then I took the hound outside to the exterior cable box, and I started getting it close to the different coaxial cables, and I was able to hear that tone. that let me know which cable went back to her living room. So I was able to terminate that wire and connect it to the cable service.

And a very inexpensive piece of cabling test equipment that we could use is a loopback adapter. If we're trying to test to make sure that maybe an Ethernet port is functioning, we could plug in a loopback adapter. And what's happening inside of this adapter is that the receive wires are looping back to the transmit wires, and if we see that port's LED light illuminated—sometimes called a link integrity light—if it illuminates, that's a good indication that we're both transmitting and receiving on that port.

Or if we're trying to see if a cable is working, we might have the cable coming out of a switchboard or a PC, and we plug that cable into the receptacle side of this loopback adapter. And if we get a link integrity light on the PC's network interface card or on the switch, that's going to be a good indication that the cable is working and that the port is working as well. And one of the most versatile cabling tools we have is a multimeter. A multimeter is going to help us measure a variety of electrical characteristics.

It can measure resistance and voltage, both AC and DC. It can measure current. But one of the most common things I use a multimeter for is to test continuity. Is a wire broken inside of a cable that we're using? Well, if we put a lead on each side of that wire, there should be nearly zero resistance showing up on the multimeter. But if it's infinity, I have an indication that the wire is broken. And if we want to test the bandwidth that we have available going out to the Internet, we might want to use a software tool called a bandwidth speed tester. And there are a variety of websites on the Internet you can use to do this.

My personal favourite is Speedtest Net. And speedtest.net gives us a roundtrip delay between our computer and a server out on the Internet. It's going to tell us the available download bandwidth and the available upload bandwidth. Another piece of test equipment is a wire map tester. And this is much like an enhanced version of the cable tester that we mentioned earlier. Specifically, it can check to make sure that the right wires are showing up on the right pins in our RG-45 connector. But it can take it a step further. It can identify different conditions, such as having a short in the wire.

You might also have a cable tap. Now, we should be aware that someone might use this for nefarious purposes. What this does is allow us to electrically connect the wires in an Ethernet cable. We're physically tapping into those wires. This is not a switch or a hub, but it's much like the old telephone wire taps that you might have heard of, where we're physically connecting copper to copper to pick up some of the electrical signal flowing through those copper wires. So while this could be a security concern, we might want to use this for testing just to make sure that data really is flowing over this copper wire.

Let's say that we have some fibre optic cabling, and maybe we need to join together two fibre optic strands because the first one was not long enough. Or maybe there's a break in the fiber, and we want to repair it. How do we join two pieces of glass together? Well, one way is to use a mechanical splicer. That's where you have an assembly that lines up the cores of the fibre optic strands, and that assembly holds them in place. And you apply some index-matched refraction gel to try to minimise light loss. However, instead of a mechanical splicer, a fusion splicer would be a better option. This is going to join together our two fibre optic strands using heat. It basically melts the two pieces of fibre together.

And that's going to give us better performance, typically, than using a mechanical splice. And one of the most commonly used tools we have in our network is snips, or sometimes we might call those cutters. Literally, to cut a wire, maybe we've stripped off the outer insulation of a category six cable, and we want to take the eight inner wires and stick them in a crimper to put on an RJ-45 connector. Well, if those eight wires are too long when we do the crimping, they're going to be hanging out of the RJ-45 connector. We don't want that. We want that connector to actually crimp down on the outer insulation. So we would use, as one example, snips or cutters to trim off the excess length of those eight inner wires.

But how do we get that out of our insulation in the first place? Well, to do that, we can use a cable stripper. And these come in a variety of shapes and sizes. But the one you see on screen here allows us to put a cable into that opening up at the top. And one side will clamp down on the cables so it doesn't slide back and forth, and the other side will actually penetrate that coating. And when you squeeze the handles, the top part separates, pulling and cutting the outer insulation away, leaving the inner wires intact.

Here are a couple of other software tools we might want to use when we're doing some diagnostics or troubleshooting on the network. What is the port scanner? We might want to see what ports are TCP or UDP ports. As examples, we might want to see what ports are open for a particular system.

For example, maybe we discover that a Linux host is running a telnet server. That could be a security concern because telnet is not encrypted. We could identify that with the port scanner in here. I'm running a port scanner on a device on my local network, and you see that it has the secure shell port opened at TCP port 22. It's acting as a DNS server on port 53 and gathering data from the Internet Storm Center on port 88 33. And another very useful application that you can install on a variety of systems is called Iperf. With Iperf, you can have one device running as the server and another device running as the client.

And you can perform some network performance tests between those two different devices. For example, on the screen, I've given the command "i perf space S," which is going to make this machine run as a server. I could then go to another machine, make it run as a client, and test things such as the throughput between those two devices. And we'll end our laundry list of cabling tools by looking at a very expensive piece of equipment.

This is a spectrum analyzer, and what it can do is measure the power of an optical source at different wavelengths. When we send a laser or, in some cases, LED light down a fibre optic cable connected to a spectrum analyzer, we should see a spike in intensity at the wavelength we believe is being used.

Or if we're using a technology like dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM), where we're using different wavelengths to send different signals, those different wavelengths, or we could say different lambdas, should show up as spikes on your spectrum analyzer. This is a great way to confirm that the wavelength we're receiving is the wavelength that we think we're using. Now, let's wrap up this video by taking one last look at the cabling tools that we've discussed. You might want to put this in your notes as a reminder of the various tools. And when you're going through your notes as you study for your exam, I recommend that you go through each of these bullets and make sure that you can describe the general purpose and the general operation of each tool.

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